Mounting Boarding Ladder

Check it out:

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I started by drilling oversized holes through the transom.  

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I then filled these holes with thickened epoxy to seal the end grain of the plywood.  These holes get drilled to their proper size once the epoxy cures, leaving an epoxy ring around the outside to seal out the water. 

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I then taped off the areas where I wanted non skid and roughed up the area with sandpaper.

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Instead of using 3M non skid adhesive, I choose to simply paint the area with non skid paint.  

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This stuff works really well.  You just add the non skid to the paint.  This is the same system I used for the cockpit and bow floor.  

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Tape removed, ready to install.

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And here it is all installed.  

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It took a few minutes to get the knots & lengths just right.  

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I made a mahogany wooden handle instead of the PVC handle called for in the plans.  

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Bennett and I came up with a simple way to secure the ladder in the up position.  We used shrink wrap on the lower portion of a carabiner to keep it from opening.  

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Inside of Port slosh well showing secured ladder lines.  

Summary:

It so much fun to see these little loose ends get wrapped up properly.  Boat building is all about the details.  Get the details right and your boat will be right.  I’ll now focus on mounting the cabin top teak hand rails.  

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Boarding Ladder w/. Hinges

The Heavy Duty SS Hinges finally arrived a few days ago.  Tonight, I got out into my shop to test fit the hinges and apply the final coat of epoxy to the boarding ladder.

Check it out:

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The hinge barrel needs to be cut into the mahogany for a proper fit.

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The lower step hinge is attached in a backwards position.

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After test fitting, I noticed the mahogany corners needed to be rounded to allow maximum movement of the hinges.  You can see the raw rounded corner in the above photo.  The hinges are loosely attached, but all alignment is correct.  

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After proper fit up, the hinges were all removed and another coat of epoxy was added to all the bolt holes, rounded corners and rasped areas.  

Summary:

Once cured, I’ll add another coat of epoxy to all the freshly cut areas prior to varnishing.  Tomorrow I’ll be back on the motor cover parts, adding mahogany cleating to the side panels.  Tons of little things to accomplish, but I’m making progress.  And, that is exactly how you build a boat.  

Boarding Ladder

Just a few shots showing the next step.  Namely, glueing the bottom tread to the lower step.  After rounding over all the parts, drilling line holes and chamfering the edges, I was for assembly.

Take a look:

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The lower tread being epoxied to the lower step.

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7/8″ thick and angled at a 45 degree, it creates a secure first step from the lake.

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I used 1″ screws from the backside to hold the step in place while the epoxy cures.

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Once cured, I’ll roll 2 coats over all the parts.

Summary:

I spoke with Kilburn today.  He gave me some good ideas for the motor cover.  I now have a lot clearer vision of what I want my motor cover to do and how to build it.  Life is good!

Boarding Ladder

After stumbling around with the motor cover, I’ve decided to build the boarding ladder first and see if I get any inspiration regarding the motor cover.  I’m torn between several design issues with regard to the cover.  So, I’m shifting gears toward the ladder while pondering the motor cover.

Take a look:

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After roughing out the main parts, I reached for my dovetail saw to make the diagonal cuts needed for the bottom tread.

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It’s not hard or difficult, just take your time and mark the parts clearly that need to be removed.  I also drilled out the 3/8″ line hole while I still had good access.

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Mocking up how the tread will fit against the side pieces.  

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Side view of the bottom tread.

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All these pieces need to be cleaned up and rounded over, but you get the general idea.

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After rounding over all the rough edges, I glued the mahogany sides to the upper step.  

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Mahogany sides to the lower step.  

Summary:

Once cured, I’ll add the lower angled tread to the bottom step and epoxy all the parts at least twice.  This design appears to be simple, clean, even elegant.  I think Kilburn is a genius.