Trailer Design and Weight Distribution

After waiting for several months, my trailer was finally completed.  I agreed to accept the trailer without bunks, to minimize the manufacturing process and to ensure I got the bunk design I wanted- by doing it myself.  The trailer rides on a 1,500 lb. torsion axle- this should provide a very cushy ride.

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I considered many different bunk designs, but in the end, I settled on three 2′ x 6′.  One 14′ and  two 10′ in length.

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I rounded the corners of the board ends to better accept the carpet wrap.

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I pre drilled and reamed all the holes so the screws would suck completely down into the wood and not scrape the hull bottom.

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I then carpeted the bunks using my pneaumatic staple gun.

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Finally, I screwed the bunks to the trailer bed.  I believe these 3 bunks will support the hull evenly and sufficiently without adding a lot of tongue weight to the trailer.  Notice how I held the bunks aft of the trailer an additional 16″?  This will allow me to balance the load by shifting the boat fore and aft on the trailer.  It’s impossible to achieve proper tongue weight if you can’t shift the load.  

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My dad and I muscled the motor into place.  I’ll bolt it to the transom after sealing the holes with epoxy.

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And, here she is.  My Skiff America on the trailer.   Wow, she look good!

Summary:

 By shifting the boat fore and aft on the trailer, we were able to establish proper balance and load distribution.  The way she now sits, we have 150 lb. of tongue weight at the hitch.  I thinks this will be just about right.   If not, we can easily shift the load for optimum trailering.  

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